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Episode 11: Athletic Performance and Caffeine

The Buzz in Physiology: (Begins at 1:34) A quick look at studies from APS journals that have been in the news.

Athletic Performance and Caffeine: (Begins at 3:05) Taking caffeine and carbohydrates together following exercise refuels the muscles more rapidly, according to a study from the Journal of Applied Physiology done by Australian researcher John Hawley of the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Australia.

Drinking It In: (Begins at 12:55) The discovery of how sugar is absorbed into the small intestine led to oral rehydration therapy and the development of rehydrating sports drinks such as Gatorade. A conversation with the man who made that discovery: Stanley Schultz of the University of Texas Medical School.

You can read Dr. Schultz’s historical perspectives paper “From a pump handle to oral rehydration therapy: a model of translational research” by clicking here.

The music that you hear at the beginning and end of the program is Body Notes, composed by scientist-musician (and APS member) Hector Rasgado-Flores. The San Diego Chamber Orchestra performs.

Running Time: 24:01

Related Press Releases:

Sweet tooth and GLUT2 Gene
Aging and Caloric Restriction
High-intensity Exercise

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Episode 10: Hydrogen Sulfide – What a Gas

Segment 1: What a Gas.  University of Alabama – Birmingham researchers Jeannette Doeller and David Kraus talk about the amazing properties of hydrogen sulfide gas. Although it’s lethal in even minute quantities, our bodies produce it and use it to good effect. Episode 10 graphic courtesy of David Kraus. Begins at 1:15.

Segment 2: Research Progress on Colon Cancer.  John Carethers of the University of California San Diego explains his research findings on colon cancer and the role that the DNA mismatch repair system plays. Begins at 15:24.

Total time: 25:10

Body Notes, the theme music at the beginning and end of the show, was composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and was performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

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Episode 9: Physiology of Marine Animals

Segment 1: Warm body, cold heart: Barbara Block of Stanford University talks about her research with the bluefin tuna, one of the few fish species to have a warm body. You can see how marine animals are being tracked by going to www.topp.org.

Segment 2: Longer, deeper: Andreas Fahlman of the University of British Columbia Marine Mammal Research Unit in Vancouver and Global Diving Research in Ontario explains the physiology that allows mammals such as sea lions to dive so much deeper and for such a long time, compared to humans. You can find a video showing the work of Dr. Fahlman and his colleagues at www.marinemammal.org/2007/fahlman.php and more is available at www.marinemammal.org/MMRU/.

The theme music you hear at the beginning and end of the show, Body Notes, was composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and was performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

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Podcasts

Episode 8: World War II Aviation Physiology

Jay B. Dean, a professor at the University of South Florida, discusses the aviation research that physiologists did during World War II. This research helped the Allies win the Air War. Dr. Dean has prepared a presentation on this topic for the Experimental Biology conference taking place in San Diego, April 5-9.

The theme music you hear at the beginning and end of the show, Body Notes, was composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and was performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.