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Episode 29: Outtakes

From the cutting room floor, here are some of the outtakes about physiology that we thought was just too interesting not to use:

1. Dusty Sarazan describes one way that physiological research helped advance cardiac surgery, and also how research led to the development of the modern treadmill
2. David Linden talks about our imperfect memories
3. David Kraus tells us why we are so sensitive to the odor of hydrogen sulfide gas (what is hydrogen sulfide gas? where does it come from and what does it do?).

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Episode 28: ‘Tis the Season That’s Hard on Your Heart

Heart attacks peak during the winter months and cold weather has been thought to be the primary culprit. But cardiologist Robert Kloner of the Keck School of Medicine and Good Samaritan Hospital found that heart attack deaths peak on Christmas and New Years in the mild climate of Los Angeles County. Could it be that the weather is not the most important factor behind the seasonal increase in heart attacks?

The show’s second segment, the Buzz in Physiology, features research on how a probiotic treatment alleviated colitis in mice and how five exercises helped women office workers suffering from repetitive strain injury. (Begins at 10:55)

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Episode 27: When the Sense of Smell Fails

What would it be like to live without being able to detect any odors? For one thing, Thanksgiving would be much less enjoyable, perhaps disturbingly so. In this episode, we talk to Robert I. Henkin of the Taste and Smell Clinic in Washington, D.C., who will tell us why people lose their sense of smell and how his research can help some people restore it. (Begins at 02:03)

The Buzz in Physiology features studies on a simple test that may determine arterial stiffness in adults older than 40 and a look at a 1950s program that tested the fitness of women to become astronauts. (Begins at 00:43)