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Episode 7: Nanoparticles and Disease

This is a re-issue of Episode 7!

Nanoparticles, which are 1,000 times smaller than a bacterium, are being manufactured and incorporated into some commercial products such as cosmetics and clothing. While nanotechnology holds promise, there is little understanding of how these super small particles might affect us if they get inside our bodies.

Two researchers from the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine will tell us about their research investigating the role these particles might play in disease. John Lieske will talk about his research on the role one nanoparticle may play in the development of kidney stones. And Virginia Miller will tell us about her work on a nanoparticle that may play a role in hardening of the arteries.

Drs. Lieske and Miller will lead a symposium on this topic at the Experimental Biology Conference on Wednesday, April 8.

The theme music you hear at the beginning and end of the show, Body Notes, was composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and was performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

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Episode 6: The Mystery of Serotonin & Hypertension

We continue our coverage of Experimental Biology 2008 with an interview with Michigan State University Professor Stephanie W. Watts, who has been investigating whether serotonin plays a role in high blood pressure.

The APS has awarded Dr. Watts the Henry Pickering Bowditch Memorial Award for early-career achievement. The award goes to a scientist younger than 42 years whose accomplishments are original and outstanding. It is the Society’s second-highest award.

The theme music that you hear at the beginning and end of the program, Body Notes, was composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

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Episode 5: Research on Heart Hormones and Cancer

In this episode of Life Lines, we talk to David Vesely, a professor at the University of South Florida and chief of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism at the James A. Haley Veterans Hospital in Tampa. Dr. Vesely talks about his research investigating the use of heart hormones as a treatment for cancer. He has just finished trials with mice and hopes to begin human trials this year.

Dr. Vesely will present his research during a symposium at the Experimental Biology conference, which will take place in April in San Diego.

The music you hear at the beginning and end of Life Lines is from Body Notes, composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

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Episode 4: Severe Asthma, Video Games, ‘One Physiology’

In this episode, we’ll talk to Ronald Sorkness (1:29) about his study on severe asthma that appears in the Journal of Applied Physiology. We’ll also ask David Spierer (13:23) whether there might be physiological benefits in playing an interactive video game. And APS President Hannah Carey (21:13) will explain how physiological research can help preserve the health of the planet.

You can find a summary of the asthma study here.

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Special Edition: Hillary’s Contribution to Physiology

In this special episode of Life Lines, we talk to John West, a professor of medicine at the University of California, who shares his memories of the late Sir Edmund Hillary. West accompanied Hillary to Mount Everest in 1960, helping to uncover how the body acclimatizes to the extremes of altitude.

The music you hear at the beginning and end of Life Lines is from Body Notes, composed by APS member Hector Rasgado-Flores and performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.

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Episode 3: Physiology of the Season

In this special holiday edition of the podcast, we’ll talk to Perry Barboza of the institute of arctic biology at the university of Alaska in Fairbanks and Lisa Leon of the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine in Natick Massachusetts.

Dr. Barboza explains how a reindeer’s physiology allows survival under such frigid winters with so little food and Dr. Leon will look at how humans adapt to extremes of heat and cold. They will also give us some pointers on how to help Santa, Rudolph and the gang as they circumnavigate the globe.

Thanks for listening to Life Lines and thanks to the good folks at soundsnap.com, especially “Radio Mall” and “Filmhits” who shared the Christmas music and sleigh bell sound effects we used in the show.

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Episode 2: Prosthetic Arms, Frozen Frogs and Alligator Hearts

In this episode, APS Executive Director Martin Frank talks with University of California physiologist John West about snorkeling elephants, galloping race horses and flying pigeons.

Marshall Montrose tells us why the stomach doesn’t digest itself.

And finally, Greg Atkinson describes the benefits the afternoon nap may…

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Podcasts

Episode 1: Snorkeling Elephants

In this episode, APS Executive Director Martin Frank talks with University of California physiologist John West about snorkeling elephants, galloping race horses and flying pigeons.

Marshall Montrose tells us why the stomach doesn’t digest itself.

And finally, Greg Atkinson describes the benefits the afternoon nap may have for your heart. For the study abstract click here.

The intro and outro music for the Life Lines podcast is from Body Notes, composed by Hector Rasgado-Flores and performed by the San Diego Chamber Orchestra.